The 5 Common Areas Investors Fail to Give Attention to When Analyzing Real Estate Deals

When you analyze a buy and hold property, one of the biggest pitfalls is overlooking various expenses and areas of the building. In today’s video, I share with you the top five most common factors that often get overlooked by many real estate investors.

Let’s jump into it!

                                                                                                    Photo Credit:   Mortgage Alliance Commercial

                                                                                                   Photo Credit: Mortgage Alliance Commercial

1. Taxes

When you’re analyzing a deal, this is one area that I see overlooked a lot. Remember that real estate taxes are always changing. Some questions that you want to keep in mind are: When does the county/state reassess their property taxes? Can I appeal the taxes for a reduction? Who can get me the information I need?

2. Current Expenses

This is a tricky one. Most time when I see investors put together the numbers on a deal, they factor in the expenses that the current operator is paying. Keep in mind that current expenses aren’t static, which means that depending on how you plan to mange the property, your expenses might be more or less. Remember, your expenses will be catered to your management style.

Related: Help Me Analyze This Real-Life Deal That Just Came Across My Desk!

3. Turn Cost

These would be considered your upgrades or value-adds. This would also include your vacancy rate. Be careful when you’re putting the numbers together for this, especially if you have a single-family home. Take into consideration how long it will be to get one tenant out and another one in. If you’re in the single-family game, you should stay on the conservative side and factor in 16%, which is about two months’ rent.

4. Proximity to Assets

What can you brag about? For this tip, you’re looking at the property through the eyes of the renter. How do they feel about what’s around your property? Is it close to cool coffee shops, jobs, transportation, sewage plant, power lines? What would make the tenant want to stay in that area or not want to be there at all?

5. Unit Flow

How does the unit feel? Is it practical? Does it make sense? Picture yourself living in the unit you’re renting out. Would it make sense to live there? Do you have all the things you need?

 

Article Resource: Bigger Pockets